I live in Nashville but want to move to New Hampshire to be close to family. On my resume, should I use a family member’s address (near the job) instead of my own? If so, how do I talk about it in an interview?

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3 replies
  1. Penelope Trunk
    Penelope Trunk says:

    Use the family’s address. In phone screen, if they ask you where you are now, say you are still working at the company in Nashville but you are going back and forth right now and you plan to have moved to New Hampshire permanently within the month. Then say, “I’ll be in New Hampshire in the next two weeks. Could I come in for an interview?”

    Here are some other tips on how to do a long-distance job hunt:
    http://blog.penelopetrunk.com/2009/09/25/6-tips-for-conducting-a-long-distance-job-hunt/

    Penelope

  2. S Williams
    S Williams says:

    Also, don’t come to NH without interviews and expect to be seen the next day. It doesn’t happen. You are better to either 1) plan ahead as Penelope suggested, or 2) give yourself two weeks while here and be SURE to research E.V.E.R.Y.T.H.I.N.G. because a lot of places will ask you about the “reasonableness” of you staying once you’ve relocated. Make sure you can afford the area, that there is sufficient housing in your price range, that you research the towns (in person, not over the Internet), you see the “good” and “bad” in each situation and …. very importantly …. that you time trips (yes, you want to “pre-time” them in traffic and non-traffic times). A normally 10-minute drive could take you and hour and a half, depending on the traffic, which direction you’re driving, where you are going to and where you are coming from. Also, living in NH and working in Mass or ME will include additional taxes and surcharges.

  3. Penelope Trunk
    Penelope Trunk says:

    S. brings up the great point that you’ll need a story to explain why you’re moving. It’s it on a whim — no family, no tie to the area, and no particular financial ability to stay there- people won’t believe you are going to stay. And, depending on the job, this could matter a lot.

    As in all things job-hunt — the stories you tell about what motivates you to make your decisions is the thing that counts the most in the interviews.

    Penelope

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